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WEATHER PROOF TILE GARDEN TABLES

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ErnieCopp

Guest
I needed water and weather proof tables, and did not find a good surfacing product at HD. I finally remembered the left over porcelain floor tile from when i tiled my veranda. 13x13x1/4".

So, i constructed a frame of 2X4 with cross blocks to form 13" squares. Took pains to keep it very square, and sprung for kiln dried wood to keep the shrinking from pulling loose the Construction adhesive used to bond the tiles.

The first one i built is sitting on concrete blocks at the proper height to work with large containers, and the one in the picture will set on some spare saw horses i have on hand.

Since i had the tile, the only cost was for the wood and adhesive. They are easily portable but heavy enough to be very stable.

I still need to get my tile saw out and cut the narrow piece, but that will be a simple job when I get around to it.

I am leaving for a 3500 mile road trip and do not want to pull a muscle or pinch a nerve so i am practicing doing some loafing this week
 

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Mr_Yan

Guest
I like the idea but am surprised you didn't put some type of underlayment down - either ply or concrete backer. While porcelain is very strong what happens when you drop something in the middle of a tile?

I used smooth porcelain floor tile for my kitchen counter and backsplash and love it.
 
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ErnieCopp

Guest
Yan,
I was a bit concerned about that same thing, when i built the first one, but i have quite a bit of the tile, so i figured i could replace it. The negative of an underlayment would be water collection, and there you would have the delamination rot or mold or whatever.

But after using the first one a few months, i no longer fear breakage. as it would take a sharp cornered, very heavy object to break it. I do not believe you could break it with your fist. It would surprise me if you could not walk on it, too.

I will let you know if it does break, as i would not want to have some one follow my lead and have it fail.

Ernie
 

w_r_ranch

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Ernie if you do have a problem & find a need for an underlayment, I would recommend using 1/4" or 1/2" concrete backer board. It was made specifically for projects such as yours.

Almost any home improvement store will carry it in stock (Lowe's & Home Depot).

 
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ErnieCopp

Guest
Sam,
I considered that, among other things, and decided preserving free drainage was more important. The first table is used for containers that provides a wet enviornment as the contaieners drain, and i do not expect much water to go through the caulked joints, but what does, i want to drain on out.

The tile could only be broken if struck deliberately with a hammer or some type of sharp force. Biggest problem i worried about was warping or rotting of the wooden frame, so my focus was to keep it as dry as possible. I am sure it will last my lifetime, and probably a lot longer than that.

Ernie
 
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